add to favorites : reference url back to results : previous : next
 

HOW AMERICAN STUDENT JOURNALISTS AT A COLLEGE NEWSPAPER CONSUME, PERCEIVE, AND DISSEMINATE NEWS AND INFORMATION ABOUT CHINA
Access this item.
TitleHOW AMERICAN STUDENT JOURNALISTS AT A COLLEGE NEWSPAPER CONSUME, PERCEIVE, AND DISSEMINATE NEWS AND INFORMATION ABOUT CHINA
AuthorWang, Xiaohua
KeywordsChina
America Student Journalist
Perception
Orientalism
Interview
AbstractWith the increase of cooperation between America and China, the average person's perception of the other country could be an important factor that influences the development of the relationship between these countries. This study was designed to explore how Americans student journalists view China and how these student journalists select the news for a campus newspaper that might influence their readers' perceptions of China. Student journalists not only represent American youth but also act as connectors and filters between a huge flow of information outside and students on campus. A convenience census sample of student journalists at a campus newspaper were surveyed and interviewed. The results showed that although Americans student journalists know more about China than before, Orientalism is still alive in their perceptions and representations of China. They have both strange "Other" and romantic images about China. They view China as a communist evil with less democracy; yet at the same time think of China as a romantic mystery with a fabulous history and colorful culture. In the process of American student journalists constructing their perceptions about China, mass media play a role of agenda-setter. Subjects depended on mass media to get to know China, and their perceptions of China mirror the orientation of the government's policy and mass media's coverage.
AdviserKenney, Richard
PublisherUniversity of Central Florida
DegreeM.A.
Degree DisciplineNicholson School of Communication
Degree GrantorSciences
Degree ProgramCommunication MA
Graduation Date2008-01-01
TypeMaster's thesis
Access LevelPublic - Allow Worldwide Access
Release Date2008-06-03
RepositoryUniversity Archives
Repository CollectionElectronic Theses and Dissertations
IdentifierCFE0002076
Access Linkhttp://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0002076

add to favorites : reference url back to results : previous : next
powered by CONTENTdm ® | contact us  ^ to top ^